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 public speaking skills

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Public Speaking Skills: 

Cool Color Commentary

An artist uses color to create a painting or drawing, but what message does a color convey? Using this public speaking skill means using color to convey a particular meaning or purpose.

Flip Chart Color
As a presenter with great public speaking skills you can use color for maximum benefit...

=> Blue, black and green inks have the greatest visibility.

=> Blue is the most pleasing color to look at with red coming in second
(note: pleasing to look at and visibility are not the same)

=> Do not do the whole chart in red ink.

=> Avoid purple ,brown ,pink and yellow inks.

=> Permanent markers give the most vivid color but dry out faster if
you leave the cap off. They also frequently bleed thru to the next
page. Forget trying to get the ink out of your clothes.

=> Water colors are less vivid and squeak when you write. Ink will wash
out of clothing.

Use Color Thoughtfully
Having great public speaking skills means you can catch people's eyes by...

=> Using bright colors for small graphics to make them stand out.

=> Using subtle colors for large graphics so they don't overwhelm.

Use Color Psychologically
Having great public speaking skills means you can change people's minds...

According to Greg Bandy in Multimedia Presentation Design for the
Uninitiated certain colors evoke certain emotions.

=> RED = Brutal, Dangerous, Hot, Stop!

=> DARK BLUE = Stable, Trustworthy, Calm

=> LIGHT BLUE = Cool, Refreshing

=> GRAY = Integrity, Neutral, Mature

=> PURPLE = Regal, Mysterious

=> GREEN = Organic, Healthy, New life, Go Money

=> ORANGE /YELLOW = Sunny, Bright, Warm

=> WHITE (if I make the example white you couldn't see it) = Pure,
Hopeful, Clean

=> BLACK = Serious, Heavy, Profitable, Death

Since "death" is a pretty heavy way to end this section, I will give you a reference to find out more about outstanding visual design.


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